____________________________________________________________________________________________

Frankie Randall Presents

"That's Italian"

***********************************************

FRANKIE  RANDALL‘S  BIG BAND MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANZA

Put Frankie Randall, Julius LaRosa, Dick Contino, Pete Barbutti and Vincent Falcone and the orchestra together, and what do you get?  You get "That's Italian!"  a Big Band musical extravaganza

          The show features famous, classic, Sinatra-era entertainers: vocalist/pianist Frankie Randall, well-known for his friendship with, and tributes to Frank Sinatra; accordionist extraordinaire and heartthrob Dick Contino; vocalist Julius LaRosa and comedian Pete Barbutti  -- all supported by legendary pianist/conductor Vincent Falcone and the orchestra.

          Frankie, noted as the last link to Sinatra’s Rat Pack, put this show together, "That's Italian", and on March 7, 2006, they appeared to a SOLD OUT audience at the McCallum Theatre in Palm Desert, CA.  They have performed to SOLD OUT audiences ever since, most recently at Trump Marina Hotel in Atlantic City, NJ, The North Shore Center For The Performing Arts in Chicago, IL, and the Parker Playhouse in Fort Lauderdale, FL.  "That's Italian" brings back the classic “Sinatra” era touch full of singing, humor and camaraderie that leaves audiences thoroughly entertained.

          Frankie Randall, a "Casino Legends Hall of Fame Inductee" and recipient of a Star on the Palm Spring's Walk of Stars, is an entertainer/vocalist/classical and jazz pianist/arranger/conductor/composer of both words and music.  Other entertainers call him "The Real Deal” - an “Entertainer’s Entertainer.” He began playing piano at the ripe age of seven winning acclaim and honors throughout New Jersey, where he was born.  Before long he was performing at many of the fashionable night clubs in New York City, and ultimately worked at Jilly’s, world renowned bistro and favorite haunt of Frank Sinatra and his friends.  From the Tonight Show, to the Merv Griffin Show and the Dean Martin Show, Frankie has performed throughout the world and continues to grace the star-studded stages of Las Vegas and Atlantic City.  

         Deana Martin, takes the audience on a musical journey, honoring her father Dean Martin and other great performers who shaped American music and popular culture for over four decades. She sings the sound track of our lives, the classics made popular the world over by her dad and his "Pallies".

          Dick Contino, the celebrated virtuoso of the accordion, receives standing ovations in main showrooms from Las Vegas to Atlantic City and headlines many fairs and festivals throughout America.  The California native who has become known as “the world’s greatest accordionist” recently completed a national tour in which he broke house records from coast to coast. 

          Julius LaRosa, at home in front of any audience,  has performed at Carnegie Hall and Philadelphia’s Academy of Music, but got his big break from Arthur Godfrey, a leading television entertainer of the day, and performed for 2 years on his immensely popular CBS TV series Arthur Godfrey and his Friends.  His hit recording of “Eh, Cumpare” is a song that translates from Italian dialect (“Hey, Neighbor, I want to sing”).  He went on to act on stage and television, and was a successful disc jockey for many years.  Julie still charms his fans with each appearance. 

          Pete Barbutti, incredibly talented as both a musician and comedian, has received the coveted “Las Vegas Entertainer of the Year” award, “Artistic Achievement Award” from the American Federation of Musicians and “Entertainer of the Year” award for his performances in Atlantic City. He has performed extensively in Las Vegas but is most famous for his hundreds of appearances on television talk shows including The Tonight Show.  Pete is perfect as the comic relief in That’s Italian”, and is enjoyed by all ages.

          Vincent Falcone, best known as Frank Sinatra's musical director and pianist, has at one time or another been pianist/conductor for many of the country's top singers including: Robert Goulet, Andy Williams, Connie Francis, Paul Anka, Dianann Caroll, Joe Piscopo, Jack Jones, Jerry Lewis, Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gorme' and Tony Bennett, among others. 

For a fun packed show of music and comedy,

Frankie Randall presents “THAT’S ITALIAN” is a must see.

“We are the FBI, Full Blooded Italians".

"Don’t Make Us Come And Get You”.

#################################################################

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Dear Frankie,

Thanks for bringing That’s Italian to the McCallum Theatre.  The show sold beyond our expectations and the audience response has been outstanding.  The audience left the auditorium thoroughly entertained. 

This unique combination of artists makes it work.  Julie LaRosa still delivers a song as well as anyone in the business.  Pete Barbutti is perfect as the comic relief for the evening, Dick Contino got a standing ovation halfway through his set and your singing brought a true “Sinatra” touch to the show.

The audience enjoyed the singing, humor and camaraderie which showed how much fun you were all having on stage.

Mitch Gershenfeld

Director of Presentations and Theater Operations at The McCallum

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

December 8, 2006

 

Mr. Larry Spellman

1740 Camino Parocella

Palm Springs, CA  92264

 

Dear Larry

 

The presence of “That’s Italian” on the Centre East stage was truly a winner!  There is no substitute for talent, and the amazing show starring Pete Barbutti, Dick Contino, Julius LaRosa and Frankie Randall is as good as it gets.  Vincent Falcone deserves the accolades he has received nationally. 

 

I loved working with this entire cast of true professionals and there was no request refused in an effort to promote the show on T.V., radio or newspaper interviews.

 

By the last performance we were family and their sparking performance still has us smiling weeks after the curtain closed.

 

Good luck on this wonderful show.

Sincerely,

Phyllis Cowen

Executive Director

North Shore Center For The Performing Arts

#################################################################

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Previous Successful Engagements

Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 8:30 PM

Frankie Randall Presents

"That's Italian"

Starring
 
Frankie Randall
Deana Martin
Pete Barbutti
 
With
 
Vincent Falcone
Conducting The Brian McCann Orchestra
 
Northern Quest Resort & Casino
Spokane Washington
100 North Hayford Road
Airway Heights, WA 99001
 
For Tickets and Information:
Please call the Box Office at
(509) 242-7000 
 

That's Italian

Put Frankie Randall, Pete Barbutti, Deana Martin with Vince Falcone conducting the Brian McCann orchestra together, and what do you get?  You get "That's Italian!" - A Big Band musical extravaganza.  The show features famous Sinatra-era entertainers: vocalist/pianist Frankie Randall, talk show favorite comedian Pete Barbutti and special guest star Deana Martin, Dean Martin's daughter, who shares the memories of her dad and his famous "Palies".  They are all supported by legendary pianist/conductor Vincent Falcone.  Vinnie traveled with Frank Sinatra for many years as his conductor and continues as musical director for the biggest names in show business, such as Tony Bennett, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme', etc.  "That's Italian" brings back the classic "Sinatra" era touch. full of singing, humor and camaraderie, leaving audiences thoroughly entertained.

*****

Sunday, June 13, 2010 at 4:00 PM

Frankie Randall Presents

"That's Italian"

Starring
 
Frankie Randall
Deana Martin
Pete Barbutti
 
With
 
Vincent Falcone
Conducting The Bill Porter Orchestra
 
Horseshoe Casino
777 Casino Center Drive
Hammond, IN 46320
 

That's Italian

Date:  Sunday, June 13th, 2010
Time:  4:00 PM
 

Put Frankie Randall, Pete Barbutti, Deana Martin with Vincent Falcone conducting the Bill Porter orchestra together, and what do you get?  You get "That's Italian!" - A Big Band musical extravaganza.  The show features famous Sinatra-era entertainers: vocalist/pianist Frankie Randall, well-known for his friendship with, and tributes to Frank Sinatra; TV Talk Show favorite, comedian Pete Barbutti and special guest star Deana Martin, Dean’s daughter who shares the memories of her dad and his famous “palies”.   They are all supported by legendary pianist/conductor Vincent Falcone and Bill Porter’s orchestra.  Vinnie traveled with Frank Sinatra for many years as his conductor and continues as musical director for the biggest names in show business, such as Tony Bennett, Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme’, etc.  "That's Italian" brings back the classic “Sinatra” era touch, full of singing, humor and camaraderie, leaving audiences thoroughly entertained.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

October 3, 2009, at 8:00 PM

Frankie Randall Presents
 
"That's Italian"
Starring
 
Frankie Randall
Julius La Rosa
Deana Martin
Pete Barbutti
 
With
Vincent Falcone Conducting
Sherrie Maricle and the "Diva" Jazz Orchestra

 

Foxwoods Resort Casino
39 Norwich-Westerly Road
Ledyard, CT 06339
 
General Information and Reservations Please Call
800-FOXWOODS (800-369-9663)
 
Tickets and Information Please Call The Box-Office
800-200-2882
 
http://www.foxwoods.com

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Sunday, November 8, 2009, at 3:00 PM

Frankie Randall Presents
 
"That's Italian"
Starring
 
Frankie Randall
Julius La Rosa
Deana Martin
Dick Contino
 
With
Vincent Falcone Conducting
The Harry James Tribute Orchestra
 
The Cerritos Performing Arts Center
21700 Center Court Drive
Cerritos, CA 90703
 

Ticket Office: (800) 300-4345 or (562) 916-8500

http://www.cerritoscenter.com

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Wednesday, December 31, 2008

"New Year's Eve"

Frankie Randall Presents

"That's Italian"

Starring
 
Dick Contino
Pete Barbutti
Frankie Randall
 
And Special Guest Star
 
Jerry Vale
 
With
 
Vincent Falcone
Conducting The Orchestra

Eastside Cannery Hotel & Casino

5255 Boulder Highway

Las Vegas, NV 89122  702-856-5300

____________________________________________________________________________________________
 

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

 
Frankie Randall Presents
 
"That's Italian"
Starring
 
Frankie Randall
Julius La Rosa
Dick Contino
Pete Barbutti
 
and
Vincent Falcone
Conducting
The Harry James Tribute Orchestra
 
Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza Foundation
2100 Thousand Oaks Boulevard
Thousand Oaks, CA 91362
 
For tickets and information, please call (805 449- ARTS (2787)
or go to their website
 
http://www.toaks.org/theatre/tickets/events/default.asp
 
____________________________________________________________________________________________
 

Sunday, September 28, 2008

Frankie Randall Presents

"That's Italian"

Starring
 
Julius La Rosa
Deana Martin
Pete Barbutti
Frankie Randall
 
And Special Guest Star
 
Jerry Vale
 
With
 
Vincent Falcone
Conducting The Orchestra

Horseshoe Casino

777 Casino Center Drive

Hammond , IN 46320

For tickets and information, please call (219) 473- 7000
or go to their website
 

http://www.Horseshoe.com

http://www.thevenue-chicago.com

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Sunday, March 16, 2008, at 3:00 PM

The Cerritos Performing Arts Center

12700 Center Court Drive

Cerritos, CA 90703

Ticket Office: (800) 300-4345 or (562) 916-8500

http://www.cerritoscenter.com/event_calendar/events_detail.cfm?id_event=3137370

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, March 17, 2008 at 8:00 PM

The Mc Callum Theatre

73-000 Fred Waring Drive

Palm Desert, CA 92260

Ticket Office: (760) 340-ARTS

http://www.mccallumtheatre.com/subscriptionseries.php?id=0

_______________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

For Availability and Booking

Please contact:

Frankie@FrankieRandall.com

View a slide show presentation for "That's Italian", click on the YouTube link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTAnR0UjnaQ

___________________________________________________________________________________

For More Information On Frankie Randall

Please Visit

http://www.FrankieRandall.com

___________________________________________________________________________________

"CAPEESHE"

Capeeshe Italiano........

This is for every person who is Italian, could be Italian, married an Italian, lived with Italians or wants to be Italian......!!!!!

Let's start at the beginning.

Come stai? Molto bene. Bon giorno. Ciao. Arrivederci. Every Italian from Italy knows these words and every Italian-American should.

But what about the goomba speech pattern? Those words and phrases that are a little Italian, a little American, and a little slang . Words every Paesano and Bacciagaloop we have heard, - words we hear throughout our Little Italyneighborhood of New York.  This form of language, the "Goomba-Italiano " has been used for generations. It's not gangster slang terms like "whack" or "vig", if that's what you are thinking---nope, this is real Guido talk!

The goomba says ciao when he arrives or leaves. He says Mama Mia anytime emotion is needed in any given situation. Mannaggia, meengya, oofah, and of course, va fongool can also be used. Capeesh?

He uses a moppeen to wipe his hands in the cuchina, gets agita from the gravy and will shkeevats meatballs unless they are homemade from the famiglia. Always foonah y our bread in the pot of gravy (sauce) or you will be considered a real googootz or a Mezzo-finookio.

There are usually plenty of mamalukes and the girl from the neighborhood with the reputation is a facia-bruta, puttana or a schifosa.


If you are called cattivo, cabbadost, sfatcheem, stupido, or strunz, you are usually a pain in the ass. A crazy diavlo can give you the malokya (evil eye), but that red horn (contra malokya) will protect you if you use it right. Don't forget to always say per favore and grazia and prego .

If you are feeling mooshadda or stounad or mezzo-morto, always head to Nonna's and she will fix you up with a little homemade manicott', cavadell', or calamar ', or some ricotta cheesecake.

Mangia some zeppoles, canolis, torrone, struffoli, shfoolyadell', pignoli cookies, or a little nutella on pannetone. Delizioso! I think I will fix myself a sangweech of cabacol' with some proshoot and mozarell' or maybe just a hot slice of peetza .

So salud' if you have any Italian blood in you and you understood anything written here! Then, you are numero uno and a professore of the goombas

If you don't get any of this, then fa Nabola with the whole thing and you are a disgraziato. Scuzi, Mia dispiachay, I didn't mean that....... Just....... Fugheddaboudit

 

FRIENDS VS. ITALIAN FRIENDS

FRIENDS: Never ask for food  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Are the reason you have no food.

FRIENDS: Will say "hello".  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Will give you a big hug and a kiss.

FRIENDS: Call your parents Mr. and Mrs.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Call your parents mom and dad.

FRIENDS: Have never seen you cry.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Cry with you.

FRIENDS: Will eat at your dinner table and leave.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Will spend hours there, talking, laughing and just being together.

FRIENDS: Borrow your stuff for a few days then give it back. ITALIAN FRIENDS: Keep your stuff so long they forget it's yours.

FRIENDS: know a few things about you.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Could write a book with direct quotes from you.

FRIENDS: Will leave you behind if that's what the crowd is doing.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Will kick the whole crowds' ass that left you.

FRIENDS: Would knock on your door.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Walk right in and say, "I'm home!"

FRIENDS: Are for a while.  ITALIAN FRIENDS: Are for life.

 

42 Things In The Life Of An Italian Child


1. You have at least one relative who wore a black dress every day for an entire year after a funeral.
2. You spent your entire childhood thinking what you ate for lunch was pronounced "sangwich."
3. Your family dog understood Italian.
4. Every Sunday afternoon of your childhood was spent visiting your grandparents and extended family.

5. You've experienced the phenomena of 150 people fitting into 50 square feet of yard during a family cookout.
6. You were surprised to discover the FDA recommends you eat three meals a day, not seven.
7. You thought killing the pig each year and having salami, capacollo, pancetta and prosciutto hanging out to dry from your shed ceiling was absolutely normal. (Wow, that's really Italian!)
8. You ate pasta for dinner at least three times a week, and every Sunday, and laughed at the commercial for Wednesday is Prince Spaghetti day.
9. You grew up thinking no fruit or vegetable had a fixed price and that the price of everything was negotiable through haggling.
10. You were as tall as your grandmother by the age of seven.
11. You thought everyone's last name ended in a vowel.
12. You thought nylons were supposed to be worn rolled to the ankles.

13. Your mom's main hobby is cleaning.
14. You were surprised to find out that wine was actually sold in stores.
15. You thought that everyone made their own tomato sauce.
16. You never ate meat on Christmas Eve or any Friday for that matter.

17. You ate your salad after the main course.
18. You thought Catholic was the only religion in the world.
19. You were beaten at least once with a wooden spoon or broom.
20. You thought every meal had to be eaten with a hunk of bread in your hand.

21. You can understand Italian but you can't speak it.
22. You have at least one relative who came over on the boat.
23. All of your uncles fought in a World War.

24. You have at least six male relatives named Tony, Frank, Joe or Louie.
25. You have relatives who aren't really your relatives.
26. You have relatives you don't speak to.
27. You drank wine before you were a teenager.
28. You relate on some level, admit it, to the Godfather and the Sopranos. I maka a meata ball you can't refuse! ...forrgetttabbboutit! badda bing!

29. You grew up in a house with a yard that didn't have one patch of dirt that didn't have a flower or a vegetable growing out of it.
30. Your grandparent's furniture was as comfortable as sitting on plastic. Wait!!!! You were sitting on plastic.
31. You thought that talking loud was normal.

32. You thought sugared almonds and the Tarantella were common at all weddings.
33. You thought everyone got pinched on the cheeks and money stuffed in their pockets by their relatives.
34. Your mother is overly protective of the males in the family no matter what their age.
35. There was a crucifix in every room of the house.
36. Wakes would be held in someone's living room.
37. You couldn't date a boy without getting approval from your father. (Oh, and he had to be Italian)

38. You called pasta "macaroni".
39. You dreaded taking out your lunch at school.
40. Going out for a cup of coffee usually meant going out for a cup of coffee over Zia's house.

41. Every condition, ailment, misfortune, memory loss and accident was attributed to the fact that you didn't eat something.
42. Those of you who get this...YOU KNOW who to pass it on to!

CIAO!

Italian Wedding


Sugared Almonds


The Tarantella

The Tarantella Dance music is probably the most recognized song of all the Italian folklore music. It literally means "tarantula" because the dance is done buy everyone in a great big circle going clockwise, until the music in the set changes, becomes faster, then they quickly change the direction to counterclockwise, this continues several times and is fun to see who keeps up. You can see this dance at authentic Italian weddings, is often the theme song of many restaurants and pizzerias, can even be heard in The Godfather movie and the CBS sitcom "That's Life". Generally played with a strong mandolin (Italian guitar) presence, each region has its own version. For example the most popular version you will undoubtedly hear most frequently is the Napoletana verson (that from the region of Naples). You are listening to it now!

ITALY



Italians

In Italy nothing is more important than la famiglia (the family); the foundation of all things Italian can be traced to that venerable institution.  The pride of being Italian is something that is passed on from parent to child, intending to convey what is best and most notable in our heritage.  Italian pride is neither a boast nor an attempt to create a sense of superiority.  Rather, it is a feeling of well-being and a connection to a long tradition of passion, excellence and accomplishment.  It nurtures our identity and supports our sense of self-esteem in an increasingly fragmented world.  As each generation of Americans moves further away from its immigrant origins, it becomes more and more urgent to recognize the talents and gifts that Italians have contributed to our adopted country by way of our heritage, i.e. culture, history, places, people and food.  To talk about wine and automobiles would in itself be subjects that would be non-ending.

Italian culture and history are the foundations of Italian pride and have a rich legacy, embracing everything from hand gestures to the Mona Lisa, from opera to the expressive beauty of the Italian language.  Italian places are distinctive geographic entities, cities like Naples, Rome, Venice, Florence, Genoa, Milan, Pompeii, Siena, Vatican City, and locales like the Italian Riviera, Sardinia, the Isle of Capri, and even the many "Little Italys" in America are unforgettable once experienced.  People of Italian background who have made major contributions to a wide range of fields.  A mere listing of a few names such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, Frank Sinatra, Joe DiMaggio, Federico Fellini, Saint Francis of Assisi, Galileo, Sophia Loren, Machiavelli, Luciano Pavoarotti, Marco Polo, Martin Scorsese, Giuseppe Verdi and Madonna, suggests something of both the historical and current influence of Italians on our contemporary world.  Finally, we come to food, which is central to the Italian character.  Italian restaurants are ubiquitous throughout the world.  Pasta and pizza can be ordered in Bangkok, Beijing and Boston. 

We believe that it is essential for individuals with an Italian back-ground to recognize the contributions of their ancestors and to pass on a sense of Italian pride to their children and grandchildren.

And the final reason - Mama.  While the father in Italian families is most often its head, the mother is unquestionably its heart and soul.  Italians venerate "Mama," who is the source of a family's nurturing, its emotional center, its spiritual and moral guide.  The role of the Italian mother is usually traditional, though, like all women, she has been affected by the winds of change that have shattered gender stereotypes and altered the roles of women in our time.  In second and third generation Italian-American families, it is not uncommon for women to work outside the home.  Nevertheless, in many Italian homes, the mother remains in charge of the domestic sphere, while the father is the primary breadwinner.  To some this may seem old-fashioned and even reactionary, but for many Italians there is no more noble work than raising a family, and Mama's absolute devotion to one of life's most central tasks is a source of great pride.

An Italian mother is often a cook and counselor, interior decorator, fashion consultant, seamstress, nurse, accountant, and just plain friend in need.  She dispenses food and advice accompanied by great portions of love.  Like the conductor of an orchestra, she manages the music of the family life through good times and bad and tries to maintain its emotional balance.  Italians, it is well known, are emotionally intense, and Italian family life can often be, to an outsider, a cacophony of noise and commotion.  Mama keeps the family functioning through all of its sound and fury.

It is said that the Italian devotion to the Virgin Mary emanates from the adoration of the mother.  Italian men, the story goes, find it embarrassing to worship a male God but have no trouble devoting themselves to the mother of God, since they are so deeply attached to their own mothers.  While Italy is not exactly a matriarch, "Mama" is a powerful and central figure in Italian life.  And she usually makes terrific marinara sauce as well!

 ___________________________________________

The foregoing is, in part, taken from a book entitled Italian Pride "101 Reasons to Be Proud You're Italian", given to me by people I love and love me, written by Federico and Stephen Moramarco.

Citadel Press.

 

 

 
<BGSOUND balance=0 src="tarantellan.mp3" volume=0>